Trains.com

Home / News & Reviews / News Wire / Amtrak, regional agency agree on study of Scranton-NYC service

Amtrak, regional agency agree on study of Scranton-NYC service

By | July 22, 2021

Pennsylvania Northeast Regional Railroad Authority to fund $400,000 look at infrastructure, potential ridership

Email Newsletter

Get the newest photos, videos, stories and more.

Map showing possible new Amtrak routes
Map showing possible new Amtrak routes
A map detail shows the proposed Scranton-New York City route to be studied by Amtrak. (Amtrak)

SCRANTON, Pa. — Amtrak and the Pennsylvania Northeast Regional Railroad Authority have reached agreement on a study to assess a potential route between Scranton and New York City.

The Pocono Record reports Amtrak will look at the route’s infrastructure and estimate possible ridership and revenue, with the authority covering the $400,000 cost of the study.

The route is one of 39 first suggested in a map released by Amtrak in March [see “Amtrak unveils ‘Connect US’ map …,” Trains News Wire, March 31, 2021], and included in a more detailed report released in May [see “Amtrak ‘Corridor Vision’ report addresses expansion plans …,” Trains News Wire, May 27, 2021].

Pennsylvania Northeast Regional Railroad Authority President Larry Malski notes the potential Scranton route has one advantage over many others: it would not require dealing with a freight host railroad. The right-of-way is all owned by public agencies: the PNRRA, NJ Transit, and Amtrak. It would require rebuilding of the 28-mile Lackawanna Cutoff between Slateford, Pa., and Port Morris, N.J.; 7 miles of that route is currently being restored.

Amtrak’s “Corridor Vision” report estimates the 136-mile trip between Scranton and New York City would take 3 hours, 25 minutes, and projected three daily round trips.

The Amtrak study is expected to take about a year.

7 thoughts on “Amtrak, regional agency agree on study of Scranton-NYC service

  1. I believe the Lackawanna station in Scranton has been restored and now functions as a hotel. What tracks still exist at that location?

  2. Eventually extending the route via Binghamton, Elmira, Corning, Hornell, Silver Springs (or Attica), Buffalo Exchange St and Niagara Falls could very well be possible. One drawback, everything beyond Scranton would require dealing with Class 1 railroads NS and CSX. The scenery would be quite nice compared to the Empire Corridor. Detour re-routing of the Lake Shore Limited would also be possible.

  3. @Richard From a (fellow) UpStater and frequent LSL, Empire Service rider I have to say that the current route along the Hudson and Mohawk rivers I think is pretty spectacular. Indeed the Hudson river line is often cited by others as one of the 20 prettiest train lines in North America. Having said that the route you cite should be pretty as well– crossing over Letchworth Gorge alone. Too bad the train was not started before they tore down the old bridge.

    1. Well so far a little of it. Two new bridges over the right of way an concrete ties with welded rail about a half mile west out of Port Morris. Maybe not to much but it’s a start.

  4. Scranton has a new intermodal transportation center, served by Martz Trailways, Greyhound, COLTS transit and taxis. Martz has 5 weekdat trips to NY from there.

You must login to submit a comment