Trains.com
You have 7 views remaining. Click here to learn about the Unlimited Membership!

Home / News & Reviews / News Wire / Surfliner, Metrolink service to resume in south Orange County

Surfliner, Metrolink service to resume in south Orange County

By | October 4, 2021

Emergency repairs completed after landslide in San Clemente, Calif.

Email Newsletter

Get the newest photos, videos, stories and more.

Heavy equipment moving rocks along rail lline at beach as train waits in distance
Heavy equipment moving rocks along rail lline at beach as train waits in distance
A BNSF work train with 38 Difco Side Dumps waits on Sept. 18, 2021, as Herzog crews, working with a pair of excavators, move rocks at the site of a landslide that halted Metrolink and Amtrak service through San Clemente, Calif. Service was scheduled to resume today. (Donald Pogue)

LOS ANGELES — Metrolink commuter rail service in south Orange County, and Amtrak Pacific Surfliner operations between LA and San Diego, were scheduled to resume this morning (Monday, Oct. 4) following the conclusion of emergency repairs to tracks near San Clemente, Calif.

Service was halted Sept. 16 after a landslide pushed the rail line out of alignment [see “Emergency repairs halt Surfliner, Metrolink service …,” Trains News Wire, Sept. 16, 2021]. This triggered a massive temporary stabilization effort that  saw approximately 12,000 tons of large rocks, known as riprap, dumped in the area by railcars. A more permanent solution will eventually be required.

Metrolink said in a press release that speed restrictions will be in effect as the affected line segment reopens, which could lead to some service delays.

Pacific Surfliner was initially halted south of Irvine, Calif., because of the closure, but since Sept. 20 bus connections had been offered between Irvine and Oceanside, Calif., with a limited rail schedule between Oceanside and San Diego.

One thought on “Surfliner, Metrolink service to resume in south Orange County

  1. What were they thinking when they built a rail line so close to the edge of the ocean? Didn’t they know that storms could cause waves that would be higher than the tracks?

You must login to submit a comment