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Home / News & Reviews / News Wire / Three injured when Oregon light rail train runs through end-of-track bumper

Three injured when Oregon light rail train runs through end-of-track bumper

By | August 6, 2022

Tri-Met accident under investigation

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LIght rail train runs through end of track bumper, breaking up concrete sidewalk
LIght rail train runs through end of track bumper, breaking up concrete sidewalk
Three people were injured Friday when this Tri-Met light rail train ran through its end-of-track bumper. (Clackamas Fire District, via Facebook)

MILWAUKIE, Ore. — Three people were injured Friday when a Tri-Met light rail train crashed into the end-of-track bumper at the Southeast Park Avenue station in Milwaukee.

KATU-TV reports the train’s operator and two of the three passengers onboard were injured; the operator was transported to a nearby hospital.

Tri-Met spokeswoman Tia York said the cause of the accident is under investigation.

“Our thoughts are with them,” she said of those who were injured. “This had to be a traumatic event for them and really startling for everyone who was on board at the time.”

6 thoughts on “Three injured when Oregon light rail train runs through end-of-track bumper

  1. At least the bumper stopped the train. Not a whole lot of speed involved. If not operator error it would have to be a mechanical issue of some sort ie brake system issue.

    1. Three passengers at the end of the line? That’s not uncommon. While it’s been a number of years since I road any form of public transportation (Bus, Streetcar, or Commuter rail), rarely have they had more than a few passengers on at the end stop. The vehicle starts to thin out just past halfway point. Occupancy of the vehicle continues to drop the closer to the end of the line it gets.
      Only times I saw a streetcar or bus full at the end of the line is when it terminates at large venue/arena with an event (concert or basketball/ football game) going on.

  2. I’m not in a position to suggest what may have caused this incident, which is certainly not unique in Tri-Met Max accident history; but Tri-Met has been advertising lately on TV asking whether people want to be a Max operator. If so, the ads suggest applying to Tri-Met to train as a bus driver, and, once qualified, can immediately apply to be a Max operator! I guess Tri-Met thinks a Max train is just an extra-long bus…

  3. What do you want to bet – a Cell-Phone, and/or a wife, a girl or boy friend, or the Tri-Met rail Dispatcher on the “train phone” might have been involved. Been there, done that, without the consequences related here. Post if you dare – a retired 24 year bus driver.

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