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Home / Videos & Photos / Photos / O gauge realism is Herb Lindsay’s legacy

O gauge realism is Herb Lindsay’s legacy

By Roger Carp | February 11, 2022

This photo gallery is a showcase of his landmark hi-rail layout

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O gauge railroad yard with trains.

O gauge realism is Herb Lindsay’s legacy. One of the landmark layouts featured in Classic Toy Trains over the years has been the O gauge model railroad designed and built by the late hobbyist and his talented wife and fellow modeler, Dagmar Lindsay.

How articles about Herb’s realistic tribute to railroading in central Pennsylvania during the postwar era influenced a generation of O gauge enthusiasts is covered in the March-April 2022 issue of CTT. The story, written and photographed by Neal Schorr, a modeler who took Herb’s lessons to heart, details how the overall look, superb landscaping (including Dagmar’s unforgettable painted backdrops), and commitment to “hi-rail” modeling have changed the hobby.

This photo gallery showcases what made Herb’s 25 x 26-foot home layout so significant to him and other O gauge operators.

A collection of articles on Herb and Dagmar Lindsay’s hi-rail layouts is here.

See a track plan for the layout here.

 

O gauge realism is Herb Lindsay's legacy. An O gauge railroad yard with trains.
At Williamsport, Herb built a yard with several tracks and a truncated version of the prototype Pennsylvania RR depot in that city. His wife, Dagmar, painted the backdrops that add depth to this 25 x 26-foot layout.
Locomotives near fueling facility and switch tower.
In the Williamsport rail yard, crews have finished work on the Pennsylvania Railroad F3 cab unit (a repainted Lionel model). The Weaver-built Baldwin VO-1000 diesel switcher keeps busy every day.
O scale coaling tower with steam engines underneath.
The structure in Williamsport that catches every visitor’s attention is the 24-inch-high coaling tower. Herb was inspired to build it after seeing plans in Model Railroader in the 1980s.
Steam engine in front of roundhouse.
Laborers rest at the roundhouse in the heat of a summer afternoon. Before long, their boss will order them to get back to work on the Weaver Pennsy 2-8-2 Mikado.
Passenger train and platform under highway bridge.
Herb built this simulated reinforced concrete highway bridge with assistance from Bob Fennessey. It blends neatly into the painted backdrop, and the figures, lights, and details finish the passenger platform scene.
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